Global Citizenship in Education & Social Practice

Course typeExchange
Course sector
Course duration5 months
ECTS30
SemesterSep. 2018 - Jan. 2019 (location Deventer) and Feb. 2019 - July 2019 (location Enschede)
LocationDeventer, Enschede
For partners ofSchool of Education

The world of the young professional is characterised by a growing global interconnectedness between people, organisations and cultures in general. New technologies and the ongoing processes of globalisation make it necessary to think afresh about the concepts of identity, diversity, nationality and citizenship and about the way we identify ourselves as professionals. People are in permanent contact with the global, even in the local realm, and intercultural encounters are a daily reality in our villages and neighbourhoods. An important question for 21st century citizenship is how to manage identities. Identity is no longer linked to a particular local community, but to a multitude of communities both local and global. The burden of identity is shifting more and more onto the shoulders of the individual. Another important question for modern citizenship is how to deal with ethical issues in a world of diversity. Global Citizenship refers to the challenge for people, professionals and communities to engage with all these global and local identities and moralities and enable people to work together in a globally connected and intercultural environment.

Set up of the minor

This minor wants to facilitate students from different study programs to work together in a multidisciplinary team. We will combine the knowledge, insights and skills from these different (and international) backgrounds to create a dynamic and explorative environment to study Global Citizenship in the context of various practices, especially teaching and social work. We focus on the local communities and neighbourhoods; because that is where the global meets the local.

Download our brochure for more information

1. Perspectives on Global Citizenship

We will read and discuss scientific articles and theories about global (and European) citizenship.  Different perspectives on global citizenship and cosmopolitanism will lead to different approaches in the working field. We will find out that morality, diversity and identity are important themes for professionals in our modern world. We will not only discuss theories, but mostly we will focus on practices in various fields e.g. Education and Social Work. Furthermore we will investigate what global (and European) citizenship means for our own professionality.

2. Identity in the 21 first century

When we talk about globalisation and the global village, identity is often discussed. What does national identity mean in a world that is characterised by growing interconnectedness, communication/ information technologies and social media? How much of our own identity is constructed by people themselves? Identity is marked by similarity and difference. We will find out that identity does involve some active engagement on our part and a tension between human agency and social structures. Furthermore there are single and multiple identities and identities can be seen as fixed or fluid and changing. How can you work with modern concepts of multiple and hybrid identities in your future profession?

3. Ethics in a world of diversity

Through ongoing processes of globalisation and migration, our societies are becoming more and more hybrid and intercultural. Diversity and ethics are important themes regarding the way people live together in our modern local communities and in the world in general. Cultural diversity and globalisation may bring about a tension between universal ethics and local values and norms. On the other hand the current globalisation and the existence of an increasingly interconnected world seem to require a common ground to promote dialog, peace, and a more humane world. For various reasons cultural diversity entails an ethical challenge for every professional. How to deal with different opinions and customs, values and norms and what is the role of the universal human rights in everyday life and in our various fields of work? There are differences on moral perceptions and moral judgments among cultures, and consequently a tension appears between moral universalism (universal ethical principles or standards) and moral cultural relativism (local or cultural ethical norms as the exclusive source for ethical standards).

4. Tackling radicalization

Violent extremism and the underlying forces of radicalisation are among the most pervasive challenges of our globalised world. Young people are particularly vulnerable to the messages of violent extremists and terrorist organisations. In the face of such threats, young people need relevant and timely learning opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that can help them build their resilience to such propaganda. We will take a closer look at local communities and the risks and challenges that can be found there with regard to radicalisation and violence. We will explore the role and function of schools, teachers, social workers and various organisations within neighbourhoods and local communities.  

5. Intercultural communication

Students will be introduced to basic thoughts and practices  regarding intercultural communication. This knowledge will be linked to different contexts, especially education and social work.  On the one hand we will look at ways to analyse culture and identity in real-life interaction. On the other hand we will discuss competencies enabling speakers to reach understanding across cultures. Finally, drawing from different exercises and assignments throughout the course, we will focus on enhancing your own cultural awareness and applying the theories to personal experiences with linguistic diversity and cultural otherness.

Action Research

Denscombe (2010, p. 6) writes that ‘an action research strategy purpose is to solve a particular problem and to produce guidelines for best practice’. Students who attend this minor have to reflect on their own professional abilities to solve problems in the realm of education and social work. The following modules/activities will support the development of these professional abilities.

6. Global Citizenship in practice

  • Research in practice
    Students will investigate role and function of Global Citizenship in practice. They have to develop and implement a project within the realm of Global Citizenship and legitimate and evaluate it ethically and scientifically.
  • B Excursion (Brussels)
    Students will participate in an excursion to a city in Europe (e.g. Brussels) to learn about good practices - with regard to Global Citizenship - by professionals in local neighbourhoods, by local institutions and NGO’s and by policymakers and politicians.


7. Portfolio

In the portfolio the student describes his or her professional development during the minor. How does the program influences the identity of the student both professionally and personally. What does global citizenship imply for the specific future field of work and profession of each student? These questions are to be explored in the interaction with the international peer group of the minor.  In the portfolio students describe a practical project about global citizenship issues that they have developed and implemented in a local community and from a multidisciplinary approach, and  also related to the field of their bachelor study. (see module 5A).

8. Professional profile

  • Social Work
    - International professionalism: comparison international innovations within social work with regard to the themes of the minor
    - Local experiences: contributions / practices relevant for Global Citizenship within local social work practices
    - Language learning  
  • Education
    - European professionalism: educational innovations in Europe and complementary 21first century skills
    - Educational practice in educational environment  
    - Language learning  

For more information download the overview timetable courses

 

The course is open to 3rd and 4th year Bachelor students in a Teacher Training programme.
The students’ home institution must have an Inter Institutional Agreement (IIA) with Saxion Teacher Training College. To apply as an exchange student for this course, please contact the International Office at your home institution. Your home institution must nominate you for this course, please contact our International Office (internationaloffice.apoe@saxion.nl). If our International Office agrees with your nomination, you can apply by completing our application form.
Application deadline is June 15th for the Autumn course.
 
If you have any questions please contact Erica Staverman: e.a.e.staverman@saxion.nl.