Course content

The combination of hardware, such as sensors and microcontrollers, and software, such as C++ and Java, forms the core of your Applied Computer Science programme. You will discover what real-time embedded systems are, and you will learn all about automating and controlling processes. What it all comes down to is ensuring that all the devices are programmed correctly so they function properly.

The first yearLearn the language of technology

In the first year you lay a solid foundation in programming, design, mathematics, and electronics. You will put this knowledge to good use as you work on various projects. Among other things, you will make a safe with an electronic code lock and a self-driving, energy-efficient robotic racing car. All the projects are controlled with C on an Arduino microcontroller. A microcontroller is the brain behind the device you are working with.

Difference between Applied Computer Science, Electrical & Electronic Engineering, and Software Engineering 

In Applied Computer Science the focus is on software, with a little hardware. Electrical & Electronic Engineering is mostly about hardware, with a little software. In a nutshell, that is the difference between the two programmes. Applied Computer Science is similar to Software Engineering, but you have to have an interest in getting a bit ‘hands on’ with the hardware. Mathematics also plays a greater role in this programme than in the standard computer science programmes, such as Software Engineering.

Study load

  • 45% Theory
  • 40% Practical and group assignments
  • 15% Study career counseling

Applied Computer Science has two themes:

  • Software engineering 
    This theme encompasses more than just programming, it involves thinking about the entire design process. You will also learn how to ensure that software is reliable, thoroughly tested, and maintainable.

  • Embedded systems
    Working together with ‘electro’ students you will learn how to design, make, program, and test embedded systems – actually, any device that contains both hardware and software but doesn't look like a personal computer, such as a smart TV, robot, or mobile phone.

  • Mathematics

  • Electrical networks: DC (direct current) and AC (alternating current)

  • Programming in C and Java

  • Software design (UML)

  • Digital electronics

  • Communication skills and personal development

  • Projects: safe, racing car

The second year

Embedded systems

Working together with ‘electro’ students you will learn how to design, make, program, and test embedded systems – actually, any device that contains both hardware and software but doesn't look like a personal computer, such as a smart TV, robot, or mobile phone.

The third yearInternship in the business world and Smart Solutions

In the third year you will complete a half-year internship and learn how to do applied research. During the Smart Solutions project you will carry out a research project as part of a team that includes students from various study programmes. This involves making use of the latest developments and insights. A good example is the Small Size Holland project, in which students work on a football robot.

The fourth yearMinor and graduation

In the fourth year you spend a half-year working on a minor. This gives you the opportunity to broaden or deepen your knowledge and skills. You can then carry out your graduation project at companies such as Demcon, Thales, and Topicus. Most graduation projects are proposed by the business community and the Saxion research groups, but you might also be able to pursue a problem facing the industry today that you suggest yourself.

Degree: Bachelor of Science (BSc)

On completion of the programme you will be awarded the Applied Computer Science degree and you may then use the BSc degree title. As a graduate of this programme you will be qualified to work for a wide range of companies as a software and hardware designer, programmer, or developer.